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Episode 23: Paint Prep

Episode 23: Paint Prep And.....we're back! Hey guys, so sorry for the delay in new episodes over the last month or so. We've all been super busy throughout the start of the summer. RaceTech moving into new offices, Jarred & Brady working on new bikes, it all adds up.  So finally we're covering Paint Prep, a topic we've been asked about before.  Our paint guru Brady Young covers most of the steps for paint prep, and Jared and Evan bring up some good questions.  We also cover some recent emails and questions at the end. Prep notes for this show:

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Episode 22: 'How to Build a Cafe Racer Guide' Review

Episode 22: 'How to Build a Cafe Racer Guide' Review Awhile back, we posted this article after a listener told us about Jim March's "How to Build a Cafe Racer" guide. We skimmed through it, but never really went over it in detail or discussed it.  After we all read the document in depth we saw it had some really good points to discuss. Make sure to download the document below and follow along to the podcast with it. Jim March's Cafe Racer Guide (PDF) We'd like to mention that all credit for this document goes to Jim March. He definitely put alot of work into compiling all this information. In this show we are using his advice as talking points to discuss, and we are not criticizing him or saying he is wrong. You are listening to our opinions on his opinions! Jim has a link in his document to tip him if you found the document helpful, but the WePay link does not work any longer. His email is in the document and it sounds like he welcomes feedback. So, what do you think?

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Episode 21: All About Suspension w/ Ed Sorbo from Lindeman Engineering

  Episode 21: All About Suspension w/ Ed Sorbo from Lindeman Engineering If you're a couple episodes behind, you don't want to miss this one! We met Ed Sorbo, owner of Lindeman Engineering at Deus Ex Machina's Saturday School event in April. Ed had a booth at Saturday School and was leading excellent suspension seminars that drew a crowd every time.  We were very excited to have him join us on the show and talk in depth about suspension. Note: this is our first show recording a remote guest via Skype. There are a few sound quality issues due to our old computer hardware. We'll be upgrading soon to be able to record remote guests with much better quality. Make sure to contact Ed at Lindeman Engineering for any of your suspension needs! Make sure to tell him you heard his Motorbike Mondays episode. Lindemann Engineering 700 East Redlands Blvd. Ste U Box 410 Redlands, CA 92373 (909) 838-4587 ed@le-suspension.com

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Episode 20: Top End Rebuilds Part 2

Episode 20: Top End Rebuilds Part 2 Episode 20 continues with Part 2 of our series on Top End Rebuilds. We pick up where we left off after describing disassembly of your motor to prepare for a top end rebuild. This episode covers the tools necessary to rebuild your top end and the steps to prepare your motor for final reassembly. It's recommended you have listened to Episode 19 before starting this show. Notes for this episode: Assembly Piston skirt scoring: Debris between cylinder and piston Motor ran hard before at operating temperature Rebore Will discuss next episode Pistons Thoroughly clean piston ring grooves, if using same pistons Install new piston rings in appropriate orientation While installing piston to connecting rod, be aware of piston orientation mark on top of piston Slide wrist pin through piston and connecting rod and insert wrist pin clip Deglazing/honing: Adding a surface for the new rings to break in Oil the cylinder wall thoroughly and tool With triton hone or ball hone on drill move tool up and down through cylinder at a constant quick motion Remove tool out of cylinder whilst still in motion Removing old gaskets: Gasket scraper Razorblade Scotchbrite pad on

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Episode 19: Top End Rebuilds Part 1

Episode 19: Top End Rebuilds Part 1 Episode 19 is part 1 in our series about rebuilding the top end of your motor. This episode will cover disassembly of your top end, and goes over the important components of the motor top end as well. Make sure to listen to Part 1 before moving onto the new Episode 20, part 2 of Top End Rebuilds. Check out the notes below for the important points to follow. Episode 19 Outline/Notes: What is a Top End? The top end of a motor is anything from the cylinders and up Why? To replace worn or damaged parts Performance upgrades Burning oil She's just tired Engine in or out? Not all bikes require you to remove the motor from the bike May be easier to rebuild it on a workbench Where to start? Remove gas tank Remove air intake and carburetors Remove exhaust Remove cables (clutch cable, tach cable) Drain fluids (oil, coolant) Disconnect battery Remove spark plugs and wires If it's connected to the motor, disconnect or remove it Removing the head: Check manual for proper process to relieve pressure off of valve train Remove cam(s), rockers, or cam followers Remove head bolts/nuts Remove heads Removing valve springs and valves: With the appropriate valve sprin

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Evan’s 1975 Yamaha RS100 Project

1975_Yamaha_RS100 (1)

Evan’s 1975 Yamaha RS100 Project

Hi guys, Evan here.  If you haven’t noticed, I’m a bad writer. Horrible really. I’m an Engineer, and I’m very good at technical writing, instructions, etc. However, I’m embarrassingly bad at writing anything else, especially my own commentary on things. At least it feels that way. Anyways, I’m going to give it a try, and attempt to blog on here my low budget 1975 Yamaha RS100 project.  This will mostly be me rambling and making notes on what I’m doing, so don’t expect anything impressive. However, the pictures should be interesting!  Lets start off with some pics of the bike as I found her:

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The bike is a 1975 Yamaha RS100. It’s a small 100cc 2 stroke street bike. There’s not a whole lot of info on them online. I assume they made them through most of the 70’s, but honestly I’ve never seen one before. I picked this bike up at the Big 3 swap meet 2 weeks ago, while wondering around with my Brother Ian, Brady, and good friends Jordan & Katie.  I completely missed the bike on my first pass through the show. Katie found it, and was considering buying it, however she was very interested in the 1971 CL350 I had at the shop.  After a little negotiation with Katie, and the owner, and $600 poorer, I was the owner of a running RS100 with bad tires, no title, and 8 year old tags.

This bike is going to be a birthday present for my beautiful girlfriend (soon to be Fiance if I can ever get enough money saved up), Whitney. It’s not much of a surprise, she already knows I picked it up, but she doesn’t know how it will end up!  She got her license last year, and has a Virago 535. However she just doesn’t ride much on the street, she’s still very scared of the Virago. I think getting her on a much smaller and less powerful bike should get her comfortable around town quickly.  I think I’m pretty safe mentioning that here, as I doubt she will ever read this blog. If you are reading this, Happy Birthday babe….you just ruined your present! haha

After getting the paperwork sorted out, current registration and title on the way, I got started looking over the bike.  I haven’t even started planning the build yet, but first things first gotta see what kind of condition it’s really in.  It definitely needed tires (ancient dry-rotted Cheng Shin’s were falling off the rim) and tubes. It ran, but poorely (carb clean should take care of that). It may need a new top end (piston/rings easily available for these). I need to check the oil injection pump to make sure it works well. It needs a new battery (6V system, battery is shot, but charging system is strong).  Front brake lever perch is destroyed (wired together on the bars).

I went ahead and ordered new tires & tubes (Shinko SR241 dual sports)0000_shinko_sr241_front_rear_dual_sport_tire_--

They are super cheap and awesome tires. I’ve run them on my KLR650 and am really stoked on them for the price. I went with 2.75-18 size from Motorcycle Superstore, which is where I always buy Shinko tires.  I used standard BikeMaster 2.75/3.00-18 tubes.  I knew these tires were going to be too wide for the front at least, and probably the rear too. I’ll have to figure out what to do about that coming up.

 I also picked up a new brake lever mount on ebay:

$T2eC16ZHJIYE9qUcOuhCBQN-ZEfnnw~~60_12

So now I need to track down a 6V battery, get the tires on and ride the bike a little, and determine if I need to do a top end rebuild or not.

I got the tires on last week. I really appreciate small tires, swapping them & the tubes by hand with 3 tire irons was cake. Especially compared to doing a rear knobby on my KLR….ugh.  I had to remove the front fender to mount the tire, which I was planning on doing anyways. I may chop it up, or just build a new one. Not sure yet. The front fender definitely acted as a fork brace, so I think I will need something tying the forks together, especially with my fat ass tearing this thing around.  I’ll work on ideas for that later. I’m also going to start figuring out what bars I’m going to run. Jarred suggested low tracker bars, and I think that’s probably the right way to go.  Then on to the rear fender, deciding what to do with the airbox, seat, etc. Anyways, here she is now with new shoes:

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If you read this, comment on it! Give me some ideas, comments, questions, advice. Remember, I’m not the bike builder here, I’m the electrical guy! haha

 

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Comments (17)

  • Avatar

    michael

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    hey very cool post I bought a 1975 rs 100 a little over a year ago and have been looking for them online, with the same luck your having. im registering mine next week

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Evan

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      Hey Michael how’d it go registering yours?

      Reply

  • Avatar

    Ian

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    Can’t wait to see this in action!

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Nick

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    Looks like a fun little project.

    I would suggest building it up as a street tracker, you’re half way there already!

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Evan

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      Ya it is. I got all the parts for it in, I’m in progress right now. I’ll have an update soon.

      Reply

  • Avatar

    Chris Jackson

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    I have a 78 cm185t with a bill of sale. The Oregon DMV says bring them a license plate. Last plate (CA) was lost in 1984. VIN is useless but I thought maybe you might have an idea on how to get this street legal. At 70 I am ready to get back on a bike. Thanks, from Chris.

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Evan

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      Hey Chris, you can get it plated again. I didn’t have a title, just a bill of sale, and I got it plated . Is the bike last registered in your name? As long as you know the name the bike is registered to in the computer, you just need to file a duplicate/transfer title form with DMV and they will reissue a title.

      Reply

  • Avatar

    Guy Shields

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    Hi…I have a 1975 RS100 purchased it certified in 2010 too many toys no time to enjoy….1573 original miles mint mint mint ..not sure the value “OR” if their is a market for this bike HELP !!! I live in Chatham Ont Canada

    Reply

    • Avatar

      rick

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      Hello guy, what are you asking for the rs100? im in Ottawa
      rick

      Reply

    • Avatar

      carlos Saldivia

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      Hi Im looking for a bike like this , would you be interrsted in selling it ?

      Reply

  • Avatar

    Evan

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    Hey Guy, from what I’ve seen there is not a huge market specifically for this bike. However, small old street bikes will always sell, especially 2-strokes…at least around here. Do you have some pictures of it?

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Leslie

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    Hi Evan, ran across this site while trying to find some info about my 1975 Yamaha RS100. I bought it last autumn off eBay. I took it out for a short spin just up and down the street a few times (I’m a new rider) and accidentally ran it out of gas. Got new gas in it and rode it a few more blocks, then heard two loud POPS and it died. Haven’t been able get it started since. It seems like a pretty clean bike, and it started right up and ran well before I ran it dry. The battery is new. Can you offer any advice about what I might try next? Thanks! — Leslie

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Amee Abel

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    I owned one of these, new, from the dealer. It was the most fun I could afford. And with me on it, it could hit 75 MPH on the highway (I was @125 lbs.) With a friend on the back, we kept to the back roads. I didn’t dare ride it from Long Island,NY to Boston, MA when I left home to go to college, so we folded down the handle bars and stuck it in the back of a Barracuda to transport it to school. My sweet bike was stolen from in front of my home in Jamaica Plain, MA–treat your beauty well and enjoy!

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Derek Nichols

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    Hey Evan! I’ve been following the podcast since you started and never noticed this build thread. I have the exact same bike that I’ve been tinkering with on the side. It’s coming out to be a pretty neat little ripper.
    How’s this one coming, now that it has been a few months?
    Derek

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Max

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    Hey Evan, I`ve just recently started listening to your podcasts and it is just too interesting to listen to. Nice little project you found for yourself. I`m in Canada and I`m starting to repair my father in law`s motorcycle. It`s an old Honda CB175 from 1975. I was stored in a shed for 30 years and I took it out not too long ago looking forward to repair it and put it back on the road. Everything seems fine but I think the pistons are jammed. Any idea what I could do to fix that? Do I need to buy new ones or can they be cleaned and re-used? Please let me know!

    Max

    Reply

  • Avatar

    1975 Yamaha RS100 3200 miles

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    Hi I have a 1975 Yamaha RS100
    3200 miles. I would like to sell. $3000.00 obo please email me if interested. Leclaire2009@gmail.com

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Darren Clark

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    Apologies for commenting on this very old post, but I want to express my gratitude for posting these pictures. I am awash with nostalgia and in tears at my desk…this was my first set of wheels!

    I received this exact bike in this exact color for my 12th birthday in 1981, but I never knew the year or model. I always just called it the Yamaha 100. Pushed it to the local fairgrounds several times a week and pretended it was a dirt bike while I learned to ride. Was able to write my learner’s test on my 16th birthday and my little single was ready to take me anywhere the pavement led. I can only imagine what that 6+ foot stringbean of a kid, too stupid to be afraid, must have looked like crouched up at WOT pretending to be a cafe racer. One feeling I will never forget (nor have ever managed to replicate since) was the adrenaline rush of accomplishment at pushing the little shaky speedo needle over 60MPH.

    If only my middle-aged self could go back and shake the sh*t out of that know-it-all kid who got so seduced by envy of the mid-80’s orgy of Ninjas, FZRs, Interceptors, etc. that by the time he was 17 he was too embarrassed to even take the little 100 out of the garage, switching his focus to cars and forgetting about the best birthday present of his life..

    Reply

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